Mikayla Daniels

Mikayla Daniels is an Alaskan born and raised writer and filmmaker. She holds her MFA in TV and Screenwriting from Stephens College and her BA in film from Eastern Washington University.

In 2018 her feature script “Wingman Lost” was chosen as an Athena List Finalist and she wrote an essay that has been published in the new book “When Women Wrote Hollywood”.

Mikayla is a regular contributor to the book reviews section of “The Journal of Screenwriting” and writes TV/Movie reviews and entertainment news for Netflixlife.com. She also is regularly invited to sit on film and writing panels and to judge and screen for film festivals worldwide.

Follow Mikayla on facebook and twitter: @palealaskan

Ryan Tucker

Ryan Dean Tucker started from humble beginnings in south central Washington. He was only 8-years-old when he was given his first camera and began his journey into the celluloid. Making short films in the backyard with his younger brother, Ryan quickly discovered Dogma filmmaking (accidentally and unaware of what that even meant) long before its proclaimed discovery in '95.

Long afternoons turned to late evenings in his youth as Ryan watched and re-watched a handful of VHS tapes and frequented local theaters ad nauseam. He started quoting obscure cinema better than he could do simple arithmetic.

By 20, Ryan was a self-made “hundred-aire” and decided to spend a ton of money he didn't have on "film school" in Ventura, California. Once he started living in his '92 Toyota Corolla, he decided to go to a different "film school" in Hollywood, California.

Once he exhausted all financial options, Ryan returned home to beautiful Spokane and, like most college graduates, got a job at Starbucks. He is now a videographer and editor for Community Colleges of Spokane. (Take that, young didn't-believe-in-yourself Ryan!)

Ryan has gone through many levels of relationship with movies from awe and inspiring moments (youth) to cynicism and jadedness (film school) to just being grateful (current state). He has attempted to make a feature-length movie and failed -- an eye-opening experience that makes him less critical as an average movie goer.

Today, you can usually find him in his basement collecting vintage video formats such as VHS, Laserdisc, CED and Beta while instilling "the old ways" to his two beautiful sons and gorgeous, tolerant wife.

Shaun O'L. Higgins

A cinema fan since childhood, Shaun first appeared as a host on Saturday Night Cinema on February 9, 2013, when he introduced the Cary Grant-Deborah Kerr classic, “An Affair to Remember”, a movie he describes as “brilliant, but not a personal favorite.”

“Frankly, if I have any favorite genres, they’d be Westerns and film-noir thrillers, by I like to follow the indie film scene and have a weakness for Japanese cinema. That said, you can guess that two of my personal favorites are “The Magnificent Seven” and “The Seven Samurai.”

And, I take “guilty pleasure” in watching “wretched excess” box-office failures like “Heaven’s Gate”, “Ishtar’, and “Exorcist II: The Heretic.”

Higgins began using movies to train executives since 1986. He holds a B.A. in Communications from DePauw University and has served as a lecturer and adjunct faculty member at major colleges and universities throughout the United States. He spent 18 years as a newspaper reporter, editor and freelancer in Indiana, Montana, Virginia, and New York, specializing in coverage of politics, government and the economy. Currently, he is trustee of Spokane’s Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture and a member of the advisory board of the Pulliam Center for Contemporary Media at DePauw.

Movie Maverick Mike Hoff

Mike has been writing about movies and Hollywood for over 30 years, and published in local newspapers and online. He has even appeared on CTV's Fame Factor. He has been an extra, screenwriter, and lecturer throughout Alberta and Washington.

Follow Mike on facebook: @moviemaverickmike